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Vol. 24 - Num. 93

Original Papers

Electrocardiogram and pre-sport screening in children

Patricia González Ildefonsoa, Irene Real Gallegoa, Aurelia del Pozo Jiménezb, Isabel Hernández Lópezb, M.ª Soledad Garrosa Garcíac, Manuel Felipe Marrero Calvod, Almudena González Prietoe, Haydeé Expósito de Menae, Pablo Prieto Matose, Beatriz Plata Izquierdof

aPediatra. CS Ávila Norte. Ávila. España.
bEnfermera. CS Ávila Norte. Ávila. España.
cAuxiliar de enfermería. CS Ávila Norte. Ávila. España.
dPediatra. Hospital Nuestra Señora de Sonsoles. Ávila. España.
eServicio de Pediatría. Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca. Salamanca. España.
fCardiología Pediátrica. Servicio de Pediatría. Complejo Asistencial Universitario de Salamanca. Salamanca. España.

Correspondence: P González . E-mail: gonzalezp@saludcastillayleon.es

Reference of this article: González Ildefonso P, Real Gallego I, del Pozo Jiménez A, Hernández López I, Garrosa García MS, Marrero Calvo MF, et al. Electrocardiogram and pre-sport screening in children. Rev Pediatr Aten Primaria. 2022;24:e27-e35.

Published in Internet: 21-01-2022 - Visits: 2522

Abstract

Introduction: there is consensus on the need to perform pre-sport screening, although with enormous differences in terms of protocols. The objective of our study is to know the status of pre-sport screenings in children, to know the prevalence of cardiovascular abnormalities and to assess the usefulness of the electrocardiogram (ECG).

Patients and methods: descriptive cross-sectional study. For two years, the medical screening proposed by the Clinical Guide for Cardiovascular Evaluation prior to sports practice in pediatrics was carried out in the check-ups of children older than 6 years, including anamnesis, physical examination and electrocardiogram.

Results: 691 children were included. 62.5% did extracurricular sports with a median of 3 hours per week (2-4.5). 52.2% of the children were federated. There are differences in the hours of sports practice and age between federated and non-federated children (p <0.001). In federated, recognition was performed in 68.1% and ECG in 19%, with significant differences between the different types of sports (p <0.001). 13% of the children studied had a family history of heart disease. 3.5% of the ECGs performed were pathological, requiring evaluation by pediatric cardiology. 6.6% of the children with a family history of heart disease and 3% of the children without a history required cardiac follow-up.

Conclusions: ECG is not included in most of the sports examinations in our environment. Investigating family history of heart disease is important.

Keywords

Electrocardiography Physical activity Pre-sport screening

 

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