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Vol. 17 - Num. 65

Consensus document

Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in Primary Health Care in non-endemic areas

Carmen Roca Saumella, A Soriano Arandesb, L Solsona Díazc, J Gascón Brustengad, Grupo de consenso Chagas-APS

aMédico de Familia. EAP el Clot. Barcelona. Institut Català de la Salut. Universitat de Barcelona. España. Comissió de Cooperació i Salut Internacional (Cocoopsi). Societat Catalana de Medicina Familiar i Comunitària (CAMFiC). Sociedad Española de Medicina Tropical y Salud Internacional (SEMTSI).
bPediatra. Unitat de Salut Internacional/Tuberculosi Drassanes-Vall Hebron, PROSICS. Barcelona. España. Asociación Española de Pediatría de Atención Primaria (AEPap). Grup d'Atenció Primària de la Societat Catalana de Pediatría. Sociedad Española de Medicina Tropical y Salud Internacional (SEMTSI).
cMédico de Familia. EAP Florida Nord. L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona. España. Institut Català de la Salut. Comissió de Cooperació i Salut Internacional (Cocoopsi). Societat Catalana de Medicina Familiar i Comunitària (CAMFiC). Sociedad Española de Medicina Tropical y Salud Internacional (SEMTSI).
dCentre de Recerca en Salut Internacional de Barcelona (CRESIB). Iniciativa de Chagas del Institut de Salut Global de Barcelona (ISGLOBAL). Sociedad Española de Medicina Tropical y Salud Internacional (SEMTSI).

Correspondence: C Roca. E-mail: croca.bcn.ics@gencat.cat

Reference of this article: Roca Saumell C, Soriano Arandes A, Solsona Díaz L, Gascón Brustenga J, Grupo de consenso Chagas-APS. Consensus document for the detection and management of Chagas disease in Primary Health Care in non-endemic areas. Rev Pediatr Aten Primaria. 2015;17:e1-e12.

Published in Internet: 23-03-2015

Abstract

Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. Although it is commonly transmitted by an insect vector in continental Latin-America, in recent decades, due to migration, it has been diagnosed in other countries such as Spain, the European country with a largest immigrant population of Latin Americans. For a long time, the patient remains asymptomatic, but some years after this stage, the symptoms can be serious (dilated cardiomyopathy, megacolon, megaesophagus). In addition, detection in pregnant women has a high priority because of the route of vertical transmission.

Several specific guidelines about Chagas disease have been developed (blood banks, maternal hospitals, HIV co-infection, organ transplant). But lack of information to primary care professionals has been detected. We consider this document written and agreed by family physicians, pediatricians and specialists in International Health will be useful.

Keywords

Chagas disease Primary Health Care Trypanosoma cruzi

 

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