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Cine y Pediatría 8
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Vol. 18 - Num. 71

Brief Reports

Delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD)

Sandra Giménez Badiaa, J Albares Tenderob, Teresa Canet Sanzc, M.ª José Jurado Luqued, Juan Antonio Madrid Péreze, Milagros Merino Andreuf, Francis Sellés Galianag

aGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Unidad Multidisciplinar de Sueño del Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCP). Barcelona . España.
bGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Clínica del Sueño Dr. Estivill. Barcelona. España.
cGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Servicio de Neurofisiología. Hospital Virgen de los Lirios. Barcelona. España.
dGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Unidad Multidisciplinar de Sueño. Hospital Universitari Vall d’Hebron. Barcelona. España.
eGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Laboratorio de Cronobiología. Departamento de Fisiología. Universidad de Murcia. Murcia . España.
fGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Unidad de Trastornos Neurológicos de Sueño. Hospital Universitario La Paz. Madrid . España.
gGrupo de Cronobiología de la Sociedad Española de Sueño.Unidad de Trastornos del Sueño. Hospital General Universitario Alicante. Alicante . España.

Correspondence: S Giménez. E-mail: sgimenez@santpau.cat

Reference of this article: Giménez Badia S, Albares Tendero J, Canet Sanz T, Jurado Luque MJ, Madrid Pérez JA, Merino Andreu M, et al. Delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD). Rev Pediatr Aten Primaria. 2016;18:e129-e139.

Published in Internet: 13-09-2016

Abstract

Delayed sleep wake phase disorder (DSWPD) or delayed sleep phase disorder is the most frequent circadian rhythm sleep disorder and is commonly seen in adolescents.

DSWPD is characterized by habitual by sleep onset and wake times that are usually delayed more than two hours relative to conventional sleep-wake times.

Clinically, affected subjects experience difficulty falling asleep and arising at socially acceptable wake time.

Enforced conventional wake times (during the school or working days), may result in

chronically insufficient sleep manifested as excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, repetitive school absences

with negative impact on their attention and academic performance. When allowed to follow their preferred schedule (during the weekends or vacation periods), the patient’s timing of sleep is delayed with normal and restoring sleep.

It is very important to make an early diagnosis to initiate treatments that minimize consequences of DSWPD. Although their repetitive attempts to adapt to conventional times, their difficulties to maintain regular school or work timings leads these adolescents to be seen as lazy and not motivated, which usually results in an increase in mood disorders and drug abuse.

Delay sleep phase is demonstrated by sleep log, actigraphy monitoring and in the timing of other circadian rhythms. Sleep hygiene, chronotherapy, bright light therapy or melatonin administration are the most habitual treatment of the DSWPD.

Keywords

Drowsiness Insomnia Sleep disorders, circadian rhythm Teenagers

 

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